Penthouse and Urban Areas

Architecture Report

At that time, Rogers had been commissioned by the government to look at ways to revitalize rundown urban areas. The massive Millennium Dome project fell under this edict, and although it has been the subject of mirth and national disappointment (one critic described it as “the world’s largest refrigerator magnet”), Rogers is proud of the construction of the Dome. The architect reports that he spent a mere $82 million of the Dome’s $1.1 billion total budget, adding he had nothing to do with its contents, which many people understand to be the problem. Lord Rogers–whose career spans the famed Lloyd’s of London building, the new Welsh Assembly building, and Paris’s Pompidou Centre with Renzo Piano–is not only deservedly renowned, but refreshingly honest. Montevetro is his first residential building in England (apart from the design of his own home) and its popularity has already been proven. In a matter of weeks, high-priced, highly-designed penthouses were snapped up at the same rate as the more demure lower-level apartments, which can hardly be considered as the dregs.

Constructed in step formation on the site of a demolished warehouse on a bend in the Thames across the river from the chicest row of terraces at Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, Montevetro can boast not only river views but also, closer on its own bank, proximity to a 17th-century church built by Sir Christopher Wren as well as a pair of landmark 1960s apartment blocks.

The Pent house
The Pent house

Lord Rogers created Montevetro as a composition of five distinct but attached parts, in ascending order from A block to E block, E forming the tallest of the stepped columns. Within each block there are two penthouse apartments, the most impressive being the taller one in the E block where views through glass walls extend 360 degrees. All penthouses have full-height glazing on their east and west elevations and double- or triple-height rooms with ceilings reaching 30 or more feet.

Model apartments with full furniture

Having considered a short list, the developers appointed Reed Creative Services Ltd. on strong recommendation to fabricate the interior of the larger of two model apartments in the D block. The fast-track commission was awarded in May 1999 with a completion date slated for the fall. Within six months, the installation, over 2,650 sq. ft. on two floors, was complete. “The specification was to create a detailed plan for the architectural organization of the apartment and to develop internal architectural finishes, materials, and detailing. We were also asked to devise a full furniture and furnishings scheme for the penthouse,” says head designer Jonathan Reed, who worked with Martin Brudniski, an associate designer who served as project manager, and Matthew Daines, the furniture and furnishings coordinator. “A showhouse would not normally be of interest to us, but this was different.”

The fusion between architecture and furniture interior design

“The developers had a challenge on their hands insofar as London is genuinely reticent about real modern architecture. Most modern developments are a little pastiche,” adds Reed. Taylor Woodrow Capital Developments being the clients, he explains, “was appealing since they have decided to become complete niche developers–not wishing to compete in average developments, only landmark one-offs.” (Woodrow’s next project will be the conversion of the Chelsea Power Station into an enormous, modern residential development within an existing shell.) “Montevetro is rare as a complete build in the U.K. and was an opportunity for Richard Rogers to conceptualize a strong residential building and for us to show the fusion between architecture and interior design. The result is a provocative architectural concept, which has translated into a very beautiful building,” Reed states, adding that he and his partner have just purchased an apartment for their own occupation in the glass building (for many reasons, but specifically because of “the enormous amounts of reflected light bouncing off the water”).

With the generous support of Donghia and Holly Hunt, who supplied fabrics for window treatments and upholstery, the team at Reed Creative Services devised a scheme atypical of expected modern interiors. “I couldn’t use white at all, and wouldn’t want to, since the natural light, at times, can be too harsh, so I opted for a melange of natural hues,” says the designer.

Architecture and furniture interior for penthouse
Architecture and furniture interior for penthouse

With a fit-out budget of $400,000 and a further $160,000 for furnishings, Reed set about aesthetically linking the penthouse’s two floors by creating an overall seamlessness where one space flows logically into another, with certain walls surfaced in Venetian stucco, punctuated by others in rippled sycamore and wenge. The space is further unified by the use of clever devices such as a dumbwaiter in black American walnut that links kitchen to library. “First of all, I couldn’t imagine walking all that way with a drinks tray, especially if it was my second, and there really is no room to have servants here–most apartments have one or two bedrooms only–although I believe some new, owners have purchased other apartments in the building to house staff,” Reed explains. “Secondly, I did not see the point of commissioning some sort of redundant sculpture to simply fill the space.” It seems the apartment’s new owner (it has already been sold) loves the dumbwaiter so much, his only requirement from Jonathan Reed now is to “make it electric.”

But the joy of this project, for Reed, was designing for an imaginary client. “It is like designing for film, where you are allowed to be practically autonomous in the decision making,” he says. The only areas Reed could not touch, since they were pre-fabricated in Denmark and slotted in as whole units by crane, were the bathrooms. This was the only concession in a project that achieves an extraordinary unity of architecture and interior design.

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Freshen Up

Architecture Shell: arrangement of furniture and objects

A few adjustments were made to the architectural shell. Baseboards, floors, and walls were left as before, but standard-height, raised panel doors were replaced with smooth ones that run all the way to the ceiling. A few soffits and arches were removed to allow the ceiling to run uninterrupted as a modernist, horizontal plane. According to Leonard, “The apartment was really a tight box. We were trying to figure out a way to blow it open without changing the architecture very much. We regarded everything that we did as a little intervention in the space.”

Furniture arrangement is important to make your house great
Furniture arrangement is important to make your house great

These “little interventions” were guided by an interest in reducing clutter, streamlining the arrangement of furniture and objects, and evoking greater space through reflections, scale shifts, color, and other optical adjustments. At the entry, Leonard and Webb added closets along one wall and, in a sort of anteroom beyond, placed beveled mirror panels on two walls to suggest an enlargement of the living room beyond. Past the living room is a master bedroom and bath. To the other side of the foyer, beyond the closets, a windowless media room was refurnished with a lean sectional sofa, leather recliners and fitted with a built-in, mirrored glass bar. The two children’s rooms that open to this space were given sandblasted glass doors to allow for the passage of light while maintaining privacy. Pale blue satin paint was used liberally throughout the apartment to create what the designers call a “calm, ethereal effect.” This light blue was reiterated in other elements, including a monochromatic painting in the entrance foyer and the master bedroom’s curtains.

marble bench, glass table, sectional sofas and recliners are selected to refurnish the living room
marble bench, glass table, sectional sofas and recliners are selected to refurnish the living room

Refurnishing the living room with sectional sofas and leather recliners

The living room furniture, much of it custom-designed, was central to Form’s efforts. In Leonard’s words, “We wanted the pieces to have a presence of their own and establish a dialogue with one another. We were really interested in the relationships of things.” To enlarge the perceived length of the room, Form designed a wool shag carpet that is hand-sheared in wide strips to suggest perspectival distance. Likewise, a 20-ft.-long brass-and-marble bench along one wall gives a sense of depth and spatial unity. The bench further provides a display surface for objects and informal seating when the family entertains.

Form recommended that the clients transfer much of their mid-century furniture to their beach house and explore instead a more sleek, postwar Italian sensibility for the city. In the living room, recliner chairs by Paolo Tomassi and Eco Parisi join a Cassina sofa from the 1970s. Colors were deployed strategically to keep the eye moving through the space, and a number of small, repeated elements unify the various pieces. The brass feet of the whitewashed maple coffee table, for example, reiterate the metal legs of the focal bench. Colorful, vintage Venini sconces and lamps were used throughout the apartment.

Additional pieces were designed by Form, including the anteroom’s sleek “four button bench,” the living room table’s acrylic flower tray, and an armchair made of white walnut, acrylic arms, nickel legs, and blue wool felt upholstery. Form also designed the media room’s red leather sectional sofa, reclining chairs and Leonard created the living room’s prominent abstract painting along with four, smaller “color studies.”

The apartment’s two bathrooms were overhauled with new fixtures and surface materials and a general reduction of bulk in favor of lightness and spatial expanse. Form used long, linear, glass mosaic tiles and terrazzo flooring in the children’s bathroom. The walls of the master bathroom are finished in mirror and Calcutta marble and the ceiling in backpainted glass that appears to extend the room upward. “Within the limitations of the box,” says Leonard, “we were mostly able to work with color, texture, scale and proportion. So that’s what we played with.”

 

If you still wonder what make a room great, this article should be helpful.

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What Makes Room Great? An Expert Reveals; Interior designer Stacey Kouros walks us through the Sydney house she transformed from blank canvas to beautiful character-filled family home

1. In the zone

“The large, open-plan living space with best recliners for relaxing has a beautiful flow through to the backyard,” Stacey explains. “Although this is ideal, the eye is immediately drawn to the expanse of glazing at the back, so the room called for smaller, more intimate areas.” This was achieved with the use of two custom-made rugs (also see living area, right), which Stacey describes as “artworks in themselves”. “The bold colours and striking geometric patterns create a strong point of interest, while adding life to the decor and anchoring each area,” she adds.

open-plan living space with best recliners
open-plan living space with best recliners

WHEN INTERIOR DESIGNER and Channel Nine homeMADE contestant Stacey Kouros (pictured left) was commissioned by Alison and Roger Feletto to transform their newly renovated four-bedroom home in Sydney’s eastern suburbs, she had plenty of reasons to be excited. Not only was this Stacey’s first solo project as Stacey Kouros Design (Staceykourosdesign.com), but she had a completely blank canvas in which to make her mark – every designer’s dream.

“I inherited great bones to work with thanks to the architect, Andrew Tzannes of Smith & Tzannes,” Stacey says. “The mid to rear sections of the Federation-style house had been completely stripped and rebuilt in a modern, minimalistic style. The architecture was outstanding.

Natural design for the most comfortable living space

However, the spaces were very sparse and needed colour, life and texture.”

The brief from the homeowners was to create a beautiful and comfortable family home, incorporating an Asian style that didn’t compete with the clean lines of the house. “They also wanted to add a fresh, vibrant and quirky aspect in each room,” Stacey says. This enabled Stacey to bring in her own particular style, which she describes as eclectic and quirky. “Although I always try to keep each space sophisticated and timeless, I feel that it’s really important to inject personality and individuality to every interior,” she adds.

Stacey says the Felettos were the perfect clients as they were open to new ideas and trusted her choices. “I created a scheme they could not imagine themselves but totally loved,” she says.

Read on to find out exactly what Stacey did to create a unique and stunning home.

2. Elegant Eastern influence

“The owners like traditional Asian elements in interiors, but this would have been too far removed from the architectural style of the house so we settled on a mod-Chinoiserie theme,” Stacey says. Once this look was decided upon, the choice of furniture soon fell into place. The black coffee table from Orient House marries with the black dining setting and contemporary dark sofa from Jardan. “The sofa is the key modern piece in the room,” Stacey says. “With its generous proportions and clean lines, it adds sleekness and quietness to the more flamboyant pieces.” Stacey then added a few bright accessories to give the space an explosion of colour and an element of fun that suits the young family.

Elegant Eastern Style Interior for the house
Elegant Eastern Style Interior for the house

3. Exotic entertaining

The Oriental theme clearly shows through in the dining chairs – Casa Mia Chippendale chairs from Garner Agencies. “They became a key feature in layering the space,” Stacey says. “The lines of the sleek modern dining table, from Zuster, set against the traditional bamboo back of the chairs, fitted the mod-Chinoiserie look perfectly.” The chair seats were covered in a rich and luxurious green velvet fabric (also used for the cushion covers, see right), chosen to contrast with the black chair frames and also to tie in with the colour palette of the rugs. “By customising a few key pieces, the space was transformed into a completely individual and unique interior,” Stacey says.

Modern dining table with traditional bambo chairs
Modern dining table with traditional bambo chairs

4. Stylish simplicity

Clean white walls provided the perfect uninterrupted backdrop for well-chosen art. “I didn’t want to clutter the wall just for the sake of filling,” Stacey says. After much searching she found a striking Andy Warhol Marilyn Monroe silkscreen print from the Conny Dietzschold Gallery in Sydney’s Waterloo that fitted the bill perfectly. “Strong yet crisp, this classic image adds a quirky element of to the space and creates the wow factor with its timelessness, while the black, charcoal and white colourway complements the room,” Stacey says. The C.Jere Urchin sculpture from Jonathan Adler (just seen, at right) was positioned next to the wallmounted TV to enhance the quirkiness and fun factor

5. Girly & glamorous ABOVE & RIGHT

Cheery yellow walls – Dulux “Softsun” – contrast with a bold green rug and vibrant red Arana chair by Jardan to create a bright and fun playroom for 3-year-old Sophia. “These strong hits of colour are further highlighted by the use of white in the bookshelf and decorative items,” Stacey explains. A repeated stencil design – Diamond Trellis from Stencil Gallery – was painted onto two walls (see right) to add an understated Oriental vibe to the space. “We stopped the stencil short of the ceiling and edges so it looks less structured and symmetrical,” Stacey adds. The finishing touch is a trailing devil’s ivy resting on an elegant plinth.

6. Gorgeous in green ABOVE & RIGHT

The mod-Chinoiserie theme is most evident in Sophia’s bedroom. “Several elements give this room a real wow factor and make it a fun space,” Stacey says. For example, the fabulous toile wallpaper – Rococo by Lorca, from Seneca – the bold green bedhead, the bamboo side table, painted white to complement the Asianstyle chair in the corner, a customised rug by Designer Rugs and, of course, the beautiful bone china angel wing lamps from Have You Met Miss Jones. “The colour palette borrows from other areas in the house,” Stacey adds.

7. Dream scene

“Alison and Roger wanted to create an intimate retreat for their master bedroom while keeping it bright and light,” Stacey says. The grasscloth wallpaper – Pacific Breeze, from Baresque – was chosen to add texture, warmth and intimacy, while the Chiang Mai Dragon fabric, used to make the bed throw, and the luxurious velvet of the cushions, both by Schumacher Fabrics from Orient House, tie in with the clients’ brief and also add depth, richness and interest to the space, Stacey explains. The hit of bold green was also chosen to follow through with the couple’s own large abstract artwork hanging in the study (see right), which leads directly from the bedroom. “It’s important to connect each space in the house, with either colour or theme,” Stacey adds. “There’s nothing worse than walking through a home where each space is completely disjointed, it needs to tell an entire story.”

8. Outdoor connection

“The backyard was such an important space to connect to the rest of the house because it fl ows directly through from the living areas,” Stacey says. The ceramic hexagonal green drum stool, from Orient House, was a simple way to continue the Asian theme while adding colour and richness to the space. “It was also a nice way of providing casual seating for guests when entertaining on a summer’s day,” Stacey adds. However, the standout furniture items in the courtyard are the two white metal Emu “Re-Trouve” chairs and side table from Ke-Zu. “The lattice-wire backs are a play on the bamboo-back chairs in the dining area, and create a light and playful setting for outdoor lounging,” Stacey explains. To add vibrant colour and extra comfort to the long stone bench, scatter cushions were covered in a dramatic yellow and grey ikat-style outdoor fabric – Schumacher Fabrics “Peacock” by Trina Turk. “The cushions were overscaled for added impact and to be proportional with the yard,” Stacey says. The sleek and contemporary barbecue bench was custom built to suit the space, which Stacey emphasises is an important aspect to consider. “Customising spaces/furnishings/ furniture to suit your home adds a personal touch and it also means it’s tailored for your house and your family, which ultimately adds that wow factor.” And Stacey stands true to her words as she has certainly achieved the “wow factor” in the Felettos’ home.

connect to the rest of the house with backyard
connect to the rest of the house with backyard
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Moden Beauty; From toddlers and teens to adults, this contemporary family home is a perfect design for all ages

Building a house is not an easy selection, especially when you have a big family with varieties of ages, from kids to toddlers, teens, and you, parents. A house design for such a family should meet demand and appropriate for each member. The story below is valuable to read to gain experience of Brett McHardie family in building their house.

BRETT McHARDIE HAS returned to his roots. The land he and his wife Karen built their family home on six years ago originally belonged to his parents. Brett’s family had first moved onto the block of land in Tamahere – situated on New Zealand’s North Island – when he was just 11. “When Brett and I met, we rented a small cottage from his parents, who still lived in the main house on this land,” Karen explains. Brett’s parents eventually sold their house and subdivided the block – and Brett and Karen were able to buy a section, which has the advantage of overlooking a gully so their view of nature will never be built out.

space for babies
space for babies

When deciding on an architect to build their family home, Brett’s architect brother Glenn was the obvious choice. “Glenn knew how we lived and what we needed from our home, so he was able to design a house that really suited us,” Karen says. “Our close relationship also meant we could be really involved in the design process. We had never built before and we knew this would be our one dream home, so it was important to get it right.”

space for toddler
space for toddler

The overall aesthetic of the home is simple, clean and no-fuss. Stack-bonded, clearfinished concrete blockwork was chosen – for its raw and unadorned nature – to feature throughout the property. “I took some convincing about using the bare block as when we were designing our home six years ago it was quite radical to have exposed concrete block in a residential building,” Karen explains. She was concerned it may look too industrial or commercial, but the result is a feeling of robustness and permanence, and links the interior to the exterior. “Looking back now I would not have it any other way,” she admits.

space for teen
space for teen

Brett, an engineer by profession, built the steelwork in the home, which gave him a great understanding of the home’s design and structure. “He is very pedantic, so it meant he was able to keep a close eye on building progress to ensure plans were being followed correctly.” The house was also “future proofed” so that part of the existing structure can support a second level, which will be a master suite. “I was up a ladder the other day cleaning some high windows and realised the view we are missing out on,” Karen says. “It has really motivated us to make these plans a reality.” In the meantime, the family are loving their home.

space for you
space for you

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Modern Eclectic; A family home is decked out with fabulous online finds to stylish effect

Furnishing and Decorating a Home

FORGET THE DIAMONDS, eBay is a girl’s best friend – well, certainly Louise Bell’s. Her home is full of beautiful, elegant and unique pieces that give it a distinct air of luxury, but were bought online for a fraction of their original price. When furnishing and decorating a home, who can afford to splurge on every single piece? Louise asks. “Being clever with decor on a budget is not that hard to do. Even as a high-school student, I wallpapered my walls floor to ceiling with photos, and handpainted my stereo. These days, eBay is my best friend.”

be clever when furnishing and decorating your house
be clever when furnishing and decorating your house

Buying Furnitures

The “dozens” of eBay purchases in the home include occasional tables, deer antlers, leather recliners, bone china collectables, cowhide rugs and coral. These are artfully combined with hand-me-downs, Vinnies buys and antique-shop finds, as well as furniture Louise bought with her husband Graeme when they first married, and pieces – such as a Moroccan wedding blanket and pouffes, a Cameroon “Juju” hat (shown right) and ikat cushions – from her online store, Table Tonic.

Recliner, chair and table: Furniture
Recliner, chair and table: Furniture

“Nothing is precious, shiny and new or matchy-matchy,” Louise says of her collection. “But together it all seems to work. Right now, I’m busting to add some brass collectables to the mix, as well as a few chunky quartz or amethyst-crystal clusters.” No doubt, Louise will soon be spending a few more hours online!

The couple found the Federation home on Sydney’s Lower North Shore six years ago, close to Christmas. Louise was having “one last look” at properties for sale on the internet before the holiday period. “I stumbled upon our place, and – despite thinking it was out of our price range – we inspected it the following morning, put in our very best offer the following week, and a few days later, it was ours.” They moved in just before their older child Jasper’s first birthday.

The house was “liveable with potential”, Louise recalls. “It was nicely presented, neat, clean and with margarine-yellow walls.” The young family simply had the floorboards stained with Feast Watson Black Japan before they settled in, then waited four years before beginning renovations – when Louise was pregnant with daughter Anoushka.

“We gutted the back half of the house, knocking out a couple of walls, which opened it right up,” Louise says. Bifold doors were installed between the living area and back garden, and internal French bifold doors between the front of the house – which features three bedrooms, a dining room and a bathroom – and the back. “With young kids they prove handy in keeping noise away from the bedrooms,” Louise explains. At the rear of the property is the kitchen, living area, main bathroom, an external laundry and a paved outdoor area and garden, with a cubbyhouse. Upstairs is an attic-style fourth bedroom, with two huge swivelling skylight windows. “A good spot to watch city fireworks from, as it turns out,” Louise says.

 

Room design with furniture
Room design with furniture

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Simple Comforts; A second house becomes a permanent home but retains its holiday vibe

Sea changes will never go out of fashion, even for a design and trend expert. David Carlson, with his wife Madeleine and their two young children, recently left the chaos of the city for a simpler, although no less comfortable, life in a seaside town less than an hour’s drive away. Although new to living in the town as permanent residents, the couple had discovered it while on holidays many years ago, well before children were on the scene. Originally a fishing village, the town had become a popular summer holiday destination for many, renowned as it was for its lovely white sandy beach, golf courses and birdwatching.

Not a permanent house, but a holiday house
Not a permanent house, but a holiday house

And during one of their visits 12 years ago, David and Madeleine fell in love with this painted, pearly grey, two-storey timber house, which had been built in the early 1900s. They were particularly attracted to its laidback summery vibe – and bought it. For many years it was their holiday home, but now, years later, they have chosen to live in it full time.

Renowed House with recliner chairs, sofas, and space for relaxRenowed House with recliner chairs, sofas, and space for relax

Although David and Madeleine didn’t make many significant changes to the four-bedroom home – they were keen to retain its original charm – they did, however, enlarge the kitchen to allow for easier entertaining of family and friends who visit in the summer holidays. The original milled timber floorboards were rubbed with a sand-coated soap, giving them a bleached look, and the interior was painted predominantly white, a colour that makes David feel like he’s permanently on holiday. In the dining room, original cornices were lowered and attached as picture rails. Children’s artwork and family photos are layered along the railing to eye-catching effect. In keeping with the neutral colour scheme and uncluttered feel, the home is furnished simply with just a few pieces – many of them market and auction-house finds. A couple of vintage posters and maps, and the odd painting, adorn the walls, but many walls are left bare. David says he prefers the “art of living” to stylish effects, and his attitude is reflected in the simplicity of the interior decorating.

The edge of living with reasonable home decor; example of convenient chairs and recliner chairThe art of living with reasonable home decor; example of convenient chairs and recliner chairs

 

The “art of living” appears to have also extended to the lack of home office. Although David does much of his work from home, he didn’t think it necessary to incorporate an office in the scheme of things. “I walk from room to room with my computer – this is a very cool and pleasant way to work!” he says. Working from home also provides the added advantage of being able to take time off during the day and head to the beach with the children. David also spends time meditating in the library, or pottering in the garden – the house is set on 1200 sq m, much of it planted with hundreds of varieties of roses, a passion of David’s. A simple home, a simple life. What more do you need?

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The Cutting Edge

Cutting edge design
Cutting edge design

Wood Engravings

When Randy Miller encountered a series of wood engravings in an out-of-print history text nearly 30 years ago, he was immediately intrigued. “The illustrations were so very appealing,” he says, recalling the handsome, incised designs. “It then occurred to me, who did them? How were they done? And more, importantly, why aren’t they being done anymore?”

Miller headed for the Boston Public library to research the subject. There he discovered the work of Thomas Bewick (1753-1828), a noted English engraver credited with resurrecting the centuries-old art of wood illustration. A metal engraver by profession, Bewick experimented with new methods of incising, producing detailed blocks that captured the subtleties of light and shadow. The art advanced, and for much of the 19th century wood engravings were a common means of illustrating books and periodicals. “Bewick invented the art,” avows Miller. “He loved working in wood.”

Wood engraving flourished until the late 1800s and early 1900s when commercial photography became popular. “Photography was the death knell for wood engravers, especially those employed by newspapers or magazines like Harper’s,” Miller explains. “They were thought of as strictly production people, and were no longer needed. It wasn’t until the 1920s that wood engraving came back as a medium for artistic expression,” he adds.

Simple Landscapes

When a sculptor offered him a gift of a dozen engraving tools, Miller gratefully accepted and tried his hand at reproducing the simple landscapes that first caught his eye. In 1972, the fledgling craftsman abandoned Boston for Alstead, New Hampshire, a quiet village situated in the western hill country. Soon after, a local writer inquired if he would be interested in engraving the illustrations for a short essay collection. Miller obliged, and shortly afterward was commissioned to engrave a series of illustrations for My Village, Sturbridge, a children’s picture book. In 1977, the book was named one of the Ten Best-Illustrated Children’s Books by The New York Times Book Review.

simple landscape
simple landscape

Like most engravers, Miller first sketches the design on paper, then transfers the design onto end-grain blocks of maple, using carbon paper. Although early engravers preferred to work with boxwood. Miller uses maple, a hard, dense wood that is readily available and able to withstand the pressure of the printing process. While good usable boxwood is impossible to come by today, Miller has stockpiled a number of previously carved blocks, hoping to engrave new images on the blank side.

He uses burins, gravers and liners – thin blades of tempered steel of varying thicknesses and beveled edges – to create the block designs. “Only the wood that hasn’t been touched by the tools makes contact with the paper,” he says.

In the past 25 years, he has produced just over 200 engravings, including commissions for the New Hampshire Historical Society and Boston’s Fanueil Hall. limited-edition prints, which depict favorite New England landscapes, historic buildings, and Shaker subjects, are displayed in the studio of his 1815 home. Miller also works as a research editor for The Old Farmer’s Almanac. To mark its 208th anniversary and celebrate its passage into the 21st century, The Almanac commissioned Miller to redesign its frontispiece.

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